March 6, 2012

A Polish Heart by Stephanie Burkhart


A Polish Heart. 
Kayelle, thanks so much for having me here today. I wanted to talk about inspiration, specifically, inspiration for my latest release, 'A Polish Heart.' The story is a 99 cent, 16K 'sweet' international contemporary romance set in Warsaw, Poland and has a family/Easter theme, perfect for this time of year.

Believe it or not, I'm not one to find inspiration in dreams. I very rarely dream. When I hit the pillow, I'm out until the alarm clock buzzes the next morning. I find a lot of my inspiration in research. When Rebecca Vickery put out a call for short stories for her Spring/Easter anthology last year I knew I wanted to be a part of it. With that in mind, I decided to draw on my Polish roots, as the strong traditions I held as a child growing up have stayed with my heart.

I grew up in New Hampshire and generally spent my Easters with my mother's family, which were Polish. My grandmother, Bopie, (short for Bopshie, Polish for grandmother) loved to make ethnic foods. There were pierogi, homemade breads, hams, stuffed cabbage, and even beet soup. The family ate the Easter meal after mass and then we'd go "up the hill" visiting. We'd eat some more, and the twins, Stanley and Johnny, would play their guitar and accordion. We'd dance to old-fashioned polkas and have a great time.

I enjoyed our Easter traditions, going to mass with my family, cooking, and visiting. As I look back, I don't think I appreciated those times as much as I do now. This upbringing really instilled in me a love of traditions and I want to pass onto my sons. Just recently, I started making pierogi with my boys. It's an all day affair since they're made from scratch, but both Andrew and Joe really get into the different aspects of cooking from making the dough, rolling it out, and stuffing it.

In 'A Polish Heart' the hero, Darrin, is a hard worker and loves being architect, but he's out of touch with his faith. He accepts a project to go overseas to Warsaw, Poland. Darrin meets Sofia, his interpreter, and what he finds is a sense of family, customs, and traditions he's been lacking, but does he want these changes to resonate in his life?

BLURB: Will Sofia's faith give Darrin his heart back?

Reviews:
5 Stars, Joy Cagil, Amazon Reviewer:
"A heartwarming tale."

'A Polish Heart' is published through Amazon Select program and is available through Amazon.

12 comments:

  1. Lovely post, Steph. I'm really looking forward to reading this. Loved The Faberge Secret

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  2. Jenny, thanks so much for popping in and I'm glad you enjoyed The Faberge Secret. Now, if only I see a real egg myself..hehe

    Smiles
    Steph

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  3. Steph, you're making me hungry!
    Good post,
    Neecy

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  4. This is a cute story, Steph. I especially liked that it was a faith story with Catholics. Nice change.

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  5. What a cutie! Do you mail those pieogi's Steph? I love the story of traditions. Sounds like a really warm read.

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  6. Neecy, I'm making myself hungry. LOL!! Thanks for popping in.

    Tara, I have to admit I was a bit nervous getting a little more faith specific, but I'm Catholic myself and it's how I explore my own faith and spiritually, and it just felt natural to write about.

    Linda, Joe is such a sweetie. As for the mailing them, I haven't tried...but if you're local I'll cook you up a batch. Both my boys getting into the making of them.

    Smiles
    Steph

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  7. I'm glad you were here today, Steph. I've known you for a long time now online, but hadn't had a chance to host you before. Thank you for hanging out at my place. ^_^

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  8. Kayelle, it's great to be here. Thanks so much for having me.
    Smiles
    Steph

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  9. Hi Steph, I admire your patience to make an all-day food with some short people underfoot.

    I've read Polish Heart and I was happy that the story involved faith and realizing what you want in life. So many people just drift from one thing to the next.

    Best wishes! Maggie
    http://mudpiesandmagnolias.blogspot.com/

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  10. Our old family traditions are such a wonderful legacy passed down from generation to generation. Sometimes we add out own little touch to them but still, we keep them close to our hearts and celebrate. Nothing warms the heart or brings back loving memories better than practicing a family tradition.
    Wonderful post, Steph.

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  11. How many of our fondest memories are of things we did for holidays when our kids were small, or our parents did for us when we were kids? It's the little things that matter, isn't it?

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  12. Maggie, Kids that age are a hoot. They'll be into it for a few minutes, go watch their cartoons, come back and be into it... lol.

    Thanks, Sarah, I agree.

    Kayelle, truly. Making perogri with my own grandmother and family are memories that are over 30 years old but I can still recall the occasions vividly. That's what I hope to pass on to my boys.

    Smiles
    Steph

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